Breguet Fauvette

Let us all watch your new project progress.
StephenB
Posts: 99
Joined: 26 Dec 2018, 08:45
Location: Hungary

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by StephenB » 01 Feb 2019, 18:41

A little bit more progress, the ply formers are all cut and I started to cut the corresponding 1/16" balsa formers indivdually before realisng it was a mugs game, so glued the ply direct to a sheet of balsa and then clamped them up to dry overnight:

IMG_1723.JPG
IMG_1725.JPG

I then produced a spliced join on the spruce longerons, not easy on 1/8" x 1/4" material, something a bandsaw probably would have handled better than my Dremel. In the end I found the best and most accurate method was to use the coarse side of my perma-grit to bevel each piece. PVA and clamped overnight:

IMG_1724.JPG

Then on to cutting out the ribs for the ruddervators, I was surprised how tiny they looked - I think these will be quite delicate when finished with just a balsa leading edge and spruce trailing edge to add:

IMG_1727.JPG

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Peter Balcombe
Posts: 942
Joined: 18 Mar 2015, 10:13
Location: Clevedon, North Somerset, U.K.

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by Peter Balcombe » 01 Feb 2019, 22:29

Going ok then Stephen.
I used a razor saw to cut the strips for my splices, but whatever method works for you.

John Vella
Posts: 194
Joined: 20 Mar 2017, 22:09
Location: UK

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by John Vella » 02 Feb 2019, 09:38

Stephen, I agree that the razor saw is a good way of cutting strip wood splices. I have a series of fine to coarse blades for different materials. I have found the painful lesson in the damage these blades can do to fingers if you lose control. Regards John.

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B Sharp
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Joined: 19 Mar 2015, 17:18
Location: Perthshire

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by B Sharp » 02 Feb 2019, 11:55

I tend to agree with all the comments as I have yet to find the perfect splicing method. Its impossible to get a good splice cut with my Dremmel jig saw or even with my razor saws. Also the longer the splice the harder it becomes.
My fall back method is to roughly angle cut the spars with the Dremmel then after clamping one cut on top of the other sand them together with my perma-grit block. This is not perfect but does give a fairly good fit.
Brian.

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chris williams
Posts: 1011
Joined: 10 Mar 2015, 10:50
Location: Blandford Dorset

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by chris williams » 02 Feb 2019, 11:59

60 grit disc on a disc sander works wonders...

SP250
Posts: 116
Joined: 18 Mar 2015, 06:19
Location: North Shropshire

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by SP250 » 02 Feb 2019, 19:41

Have used my router mounted upside down in the workmate and screwed temporary angle iron fence at the required taper angle to the top.
Works for me, just mind your fingers though.

John M

StephenB
Posts: 99
Joined: 26 Dec 2018, 08:45
Location: Hungary

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by StephenB » 04 Feb 2019, 18:18

A bit more progress, the tailplane ribs were produced using the sandwich method so should soon be able to put the empennage together:

TP Ribs (1).jpg

Now gettiing close to assembling/glueing the fuselage together, I tried a dry fit on the jig to make sure everything went together or needed some final fettling:

Dry Jig (1).jpg

I might have erred in producing former supports that are too simplistic, I have marked the datum line on all the formers which gives me a horizontal reference point but I'm finding it a lot of faff to measure up from each side to level them, unclamping and re-clamping is not the most precise method of adjustment. I notice that others have produced T shaped supports with a horizonal bar extending outside of the former. I have thought of making a new set of supports but I'd like to avoid that if possible so I'll have another jiggle around tomorrow and see if I can crack it with the set up I have.

On a more positive note, I went shopping this morning and came back with a piece of plasterboard ideally sized at 2M x 600mm for building the wing on. I say wing as there is only one on the plan, any suggestions for the easiest/quickest method of producing the second one?

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Cliff Evans
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Joined: 13 Mar 2015, 10:32
Location: Bristol
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Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by Cliff Evans » 04 Feb 2019, 18:20

rub parafin on the plan, makes it transparent enough to see from the other side!

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Peter Balcombe
Posts: 942
Joined: 18 Mar 2015, 10:13
Location: Clevedon, North Somerset, U.K.

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by Peter Balcombe » 04 Feb 2019, 18:28

Stephen,
Also possible to trace the important lines on the rear of the plan sheet if you temporarily tape the plan to a large window/patio door pane (printed side to glass).
The rear illumination then shows up all of the print on the reverse side ;)

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RobbieB
Posts: 531
Joined: 07 Mar 2015, 22:22
Location: North West

Re: Breguet Fauvette

Post by RobbieB » 04 Feb 2019, 22:24

StephenB wrote:
04 Feb 2019, 18:18
'.................I might have erred in producing former supports that are too simplistic, I have marked the datum line on all the formers which gives me a horizontal reference point but I'm finding it a lot of faff to measure up from each side to level them, unclamping and re-clamping is not the most precise method of adjustment. I notice that others have produced T shaped supports with a horizonal bar extending outside of the former. I have thought of making a new set of supports but I'd like to avoid that if possible so I'll have another jiggle around tomorrow and see if I can crack it with the set up I have.

On a more positive note, I went shopping this morning and came back with a piece of plasterboard ideally sized at 2M x 600mm for building the wing on. I say wing as there is only one on the plan, any suggestions for the easiest/quickest method of producing the second one?'
Stephen,

The jig adaptor plates are ok, just need a bit of fine tuning and a better way of clamping the formers to them.
Make sure each plate is in contact with the jig base once secured to the ali angle - that way they can't rock from side to side.

Also, I never found those spring clamps, even heavy duty ones really satisfactory for this job - proper mini g-clamps are much better, done up really tight and preferably one each side when you are at the early stages of construction when you are struggling getting longerons to fit.
skylark_jig.jpg

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